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In this section we have spot diagnoses posted on a daily basis since June 2010, now over 1700! You can review the archived cases and read the suggested diagnoses by users and the final comment by Dr Uma Sundram, the Editor-in-Chief and main spot diagnosis host. Case are uploaded each week day by 10 a.m. UK time with the correct diagnosis will generally be posted at 8 p.m. UK time. Why not view the most recent spot diagnosis and proffer a diagnosis?

Case Number : Case 2018 - 01 March 2018 Posted By: Guest

Please read the clinical history and view the images by clicking on them before you proffer your diagnosis.
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Clinical History: A 16-month-old male Caucasian patient was referred with an eight-month history of chronic incessant, intensely pruritic crops of pustules predominantly affecting the scalp area, the face and limbs. The child’s mother reported that the pustules occurred intermittently in crops and were aggravated by childhood viral illnesses. The child was not taking any regular medication and his family history was unremarkable. He had been prescribed numerous courses of oral antibiotics and topical steroids of varying potencies with little benefit.

Edited by Admin_Dermpath


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dermpath1

Posted

Hypereosinophilic syndrome.

CBC and differentials are advised.

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Saman Fatah

Posted

Eosinophilic pustulosis of infancy (AKA Eosinophilic pustular folliculitis of infancy), not all biopsies shows follicular involvement as previously thought.

Cutaneous manifestation of Hyper IgE syndrome is a histological DDx and requires integration of other information from CPC. 

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Admin_Dermpath

Posted

From Dr Saleem Taibjee

I am favouring eosinophilic folliculitis, the scalp predilection is a clue. Have seen 2-3 cases. It seems to gradually resolve with time.

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Uma Sundram

Posted

Agree. A great case. I would also consider something really simple (common things being common), like scabies or other types of insect bite reactions.

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Dr. Mona Abdel-Halim

Posted

Esinophilic pustular folliculitis

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